80+1 » France http://www.80plus1.org A Journey Around the World Thu, 25 Nov 2010 14:24:05 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.7.1 en hourly 1 Chocolate-scented stamps arrive in France http://www.80plus1.org/blog/chocolate-scented-stamps-arrive-in-france http://www.80plus1.org/blog/chocolate-scented-stamps-arrive-in-france#comments Fri, 10 Jul 2009 08:35:13 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=2180 Last month, the French postal service, known simply as La Poste, released a limited-edition set of stamps that yes, smell like chocolate.

They cost the same price of a normal 0,56€ French stamp, or you can get a sheet of…

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Last month, the French postal service, known simply as La Poste, released a limited-edition set of stamps that yes, smell like chocolate.

They cost the same price of a normal 0,56€ French stamp, or you can get a sheet of ten for 5,60€.

Each one is designed with various chocolate-related imagery.

If only La Poste would come out with different scented stamps! Imagine the possibilities! Neopolitan letters, anyone?

[via David Lebovitz ; hat tip to Alan Wiig]

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US-France Roquefort dispute ends http://www.80plus1.org/blog/us-france-roquefort-dispute-ends http://www.80plus1.org/blog/us-france-roquefort-dispute-ends#comments Fri, 08 May 2009 07:54:02 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=935 Telegraph cheese beat writer Henry Samuel brings us the delicious news that the US has finally agreed to drop its 300 percent tariff on the traditional French blue cheese.

For those who hadn’t been following this story as closely as Mr. Samuel, shortly…

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Telegraph cheese beat writer Henry Samuel brings us the delicious news that the US has finally agreed to drop its 300 percent tariff on the traditional French blue cheese.

For those who hadn’t been following this story as closely as Mr. Samuel, shortly before leaving office, the Bush Administration had approved a 100 percent import duty on a bunch of European Union food products. France is upset because one of its main cheeses, roquefort, is being hit with a 300 percent tariff. Many had read this as the Bush Administration’s annoyance with a French ban against hormone-treated US beef.

In a joint statement on Wednesday, EU Trade Commissioner Catherine Ashton and United States Trade Representative Ron Kirk agreed that “an agreement is in our mutual interest,” and that “we will now discuss this with our respective stakeholders and constituencies in an effort to finalize it as soon as possible.”

So how did the two sides come to an agreement?

The US will drop its tariff in exchange for a quadrupling of non-hormone treated American beef.

If Martin Malvy is still looking for someone to send a case of roquefort to, we here at 80+1 would be happy to accept.

[via FP Passport]

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Air France flight from France to Mexico not allowed to fly over US airspace http://www.80plus1.org/blog/air-france-flight-from-france-to-mexico-not-allowed-to-fly-over-us-airspace http://www.80plus1.org/blog/air-france-flight-from-france-to-mexico-not-allowed-to-fly-over-us-airspace#comments Mon, 27 Apr 2009 07:18:19 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=708 While Traffic is a theme here at 80+1, we tend to focus on automobile traffic, and lose sight of air traffic. In the air, as on the ground, airplanes have very complex procedures and processes that they must follow. These include…

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While Traffic is a theme here at 80+1, we tend to focus on automobile traffic, and lose sight of air traffic. In the air, as on the ground, airplanes have very complex procedures and processes that they must follow. These include an unprecedented amount of airplane security that has not abated since its inception in late 2001.

Take the recent example of Air France Flight 438 from Paris Charles de Gaulle airport to Mexico City Benito Juárez airport, due to land at 18h00 on Saturday April 18, 2009.

On board was Colombian journalist Hernando Calvo Ospina, who writes for the famed French newspaper Le Monde Diplomatique and is the author of Bacardi: The Hidden War.

About five hours before the plane was due to land, wrote Ospina after the episode: “the captain’s voice announced that U.S. authorities had prohibited the plane from flying over U.S. territory. The explanation: among the passengers aboard was a person who was not welcome in the United States for reasons of national security.”

The captain then told the passengers that the plane was going to make an unscheduled “refueling” stop in Fort-de-France, Martinique.

However, as Ospina writes: “But the central question, spoken in undertones, was the identity of the “terrorist” passenger, because if the “gringos” say it, “it must be because he must be a terrorist.”"

Ospina was questioned by French officials at the behest of American authorities and was ultimately released and allowed to continue on his trip to Nicaragua. This encounter raises troubling questions about how much power the U.S. continues to exert over foreign countries and companies concerning potential terrorist threats.

Ospina and his publisher apparently will be suing for compensation.

[via Boing Boing]

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Making Our Literary and Historical Heritage Available Online http://www.80plus1.org/blog/making-our-literary-and-historical-heritage-available-online http://www.80plus1.org/blog/making-our-literary-and-historical-heritage-available-online#comments Tue, 21 Apr 2009 19:39:04 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=537 One item that caught my eye in the news today was that UNESCO has just opened the World Digital Library, the first online, international, book depository.

The project, which launched today in Paris, “draws material from more than 30 national libraries and…

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One item that caught my eye in the news today was that UNESCO has just opened the World Digital Library, the first online, international, book depository.

The project, which launched today in Paris, “draws material from more than 30 national libraries and other institutions from around the world, joins a growing number of programs that have set out to digitally archive cultural material,” as The New York Times reported.

While the archive is far from complete, day one does offer up quite a range of stuff, from an 1859 German language map entitled “Emigrant’s Map and Guide for Routes to North America,” to a 1724 reprint of the 1690 map of “The Kingdom of France.

The archive offers all materials in the six UN languages, plus Portuguese.

So far, quite a range of countries and their national libraries and cultural institutions have contributed to the WDL, including Saudi Arabia, Brazil, China, Egypt, USA, France, Japan, UK and Russia, adds Le Monde.

One can only hope that more and more of these materials that have been kept in dusty archives for so long can now be only a few keystrokes away.

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