80+1 » Beijing http://www.80plus1.org A Journey Around the World Thu, 25 Nov 2010 14:24:05 +0000 http://wordpress.org/?v=2.7.1 en hourly 1 China takes larger steps to combat climate change http://www.80plus1.org/blog/china-takes-larger-steps-to-combat-climate-change http://www.80plus1.org/blog/china-takes-larger-steps-to-combat-climate-change#comments Mon, 24 Aug 2009 07:51:43 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=3658 Following a meeting between British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Chinese officials in Beijing, China is expected to begin its next five-year development plan in 2011 with stricter measures to halt carbon dioxide emissions.

According to a report by Reuters: “I…

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Following a meeting between British Prime Minister Tony Blair and Chinese officials in Beijing, China is expected to begin its next five-year development plan in 2011 with stricter measures to halt carbon dioxide emissions.

According to a report by Reuters: “I think the single most important thing is to understand that in its development plans — in other words, how the Chinese economy grows over the coming years — low-carbon growth is at the heart of those plans,” Blair told a news conference.

It is expected that Western nations will put increased pressure on China at the upcoming Copenhagen conference, which will act as the new Kyoto Protocol, which is set to expire in 2012.

Already China is booming in the green energy sector and has a nation-wide goal of cutting energy use by 20 percent over the next five years to 2010 levels.

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Over 1,200 new cars hit Beijing streets every day http://www.80plus1.org/blog/over-1200-new-cars-hit-beijing-streets-every-day http://www.80plus1.org/blog/over-1200-new-cars-hit-beijing-streets-every-day#comments Mon, 17 Aug 2009 12:55:09 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=3362 According to the Agence France Presse, quoting Chinese state media agency Xinhua this past weekend, more than 1,200 new cars every single day. According to the Beijing Traffic Management Bureau, there were 261,000 new vehicles registered in the first half…

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According to the Agence France Presse, quoting Chinese state media agency Xinhua this past weekend, more than 1,200 new cars every single day. According to the Beijing Traffic Management Bureau, there were 261,000 new vehicles registered in the first half of 2009.

That’s a nine percent increase from the first half of 2008.

Given how fast China is booming, and sucking down energy faster than it can build power plants, traffic in Beijing must be horrendous.

According to the same Chinese government agency, around one of three Beijing residents has a driver’s license. Sadly, that office didn’t say how many illegal drivers there must be.

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Protests move into new phase 20 years after Tiananmen http://www.80plus1.org/blog/protests-move-into-new-phase-20-years-after-tiananmen http://www.80plus1.org/blog/protests-move-into-new-phase-20-years-after-tiananmen#comments Tue, 02 Jun 2009 15:35:48 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://www.80plus1.org/?p=1106 This week marks the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, the June 4 culmination of a weeks-long protest in Beijing to commemorate the April 15, 1989 death of Hu Yaobang, a prominent reformer within the Chinese government. On June…

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This week marks the 20th anniversary of the Tiananmen Square massacre, the June 4 culmination of a weeks-long protest in Beijing to commemorate the April 15, 1989 death of Hu Yaobang, a prominent reformer within the Chinese government. On June 4, 1989, Chinese tanks invaded Tiananmen Square, the center of the Beijing protests. As a result of the government’s actions, hundreds died and thousands more were wounded.

This past weekend, Hong Kong held a large protest to remember the protest of a past era — as such a protest could likely never be held again in the same way on the mainland.

The Wall Street Journal notes that in recent years, protests in China have shifted to poorer, lesser-educated rural people instead of the intellectual middle-class.

In 1989, college campuses were hotbeds of dissent in Beijing. Tens of thousands of residents took to the streets, with protests swelling over the course of a month before they were quelled by guns and tanks. The latest crop of college students — most of whom are too young to remember the tumultuous events of 1989 — are focused on career advancement in a market-driven economy, and have little time for political activism, historians and educators say.

Protest leaders in the capital today are mainly out-of-town petitioners — inheritors of an age-old tradition under which ordinary citizens from the provinces turn to the central government to enlist the help of powerful officials to right personal wrongs. But now petitioners have begun to organize, joining together to protest many different issues, rather than just their own cause.

There’s also a level of technological sophistication being carried out both by the Chinese government today, and the new generation of protestors, the Journal reports.

In the post-Tiananmen era, the Communist government’s methods of political control have grown more sophisticated. For instance, officials have become adept at swaying public opinion. They still censor the media, but increasingly use more subtle methods, such as paying contributors to popular Internet forums to steer discussions, according to people who closely watch the Internet.

The government tightly controls content posted online by Web sites registered in China. China asks Web site owners whom it licenses to filter out content related to politically sensitive issues and periodically blocks overseas Web sites with content it deems objectionable.

China rarely acknowledges its censorship, but has said on a few occasions that it is not the only government that regulates the Internet.

But protesters have gotten more sophisticated too. Ms. Shen carries two cell phones and three SIM cards with different phone numbers. One is a registered contact number that the government has on file, which she usually keeps off so she can’t be traced. Another she uses to keep in touch with other petitioners. The third is always on and used to communicate with trusted friends and family. Some protesters pluck the batteries out of their phones as they move around the city so authorities can’t track their progress.

In addition, as the country gets ready for the upcoming 20th anniversary, Beijing has already taken some “precautions” — Twitter has been blocked across the entire country beginning at 09h00 GMT on June 2.

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Beijing, China http://www.80plus1.org/places/beijing http://www.80plus1.org/places/beijing#comments Fri, 27 Mar 2009 14:20:48 +0000 Cyrus Farivar http://90.146.8.9/80plus1/?page_id=99 Topic: Food
Schedule: Week 2 (June 24 - July 1)
Art Project: Blowing
School Projects: BHAK Steyr
Partner Schools: International School (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

With a population of over 17 million people, Beijing is one of the oldest and largest cities in the entire world.…

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Topic: Food
Schedule: Week 2 (June 24 - July 1)
Art Project: Blowing
School Projects: BHAK Steyr
Partner Schools: International School (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

With a population of over 17 million people, Beijing is one of the oldest and largest cities in the entire world. As the capital of the world’s most populous nation, Beijing has developed its own unique culinary culture, and is the home to Peking Duck, fuling jiabing (a pancake-like snack), and many other Mandarin dishes. Given that the capital attracts so many immigrants from other parts of China, and around the world, it easily adapts other gastronomic traditions into its own repertoire.

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